Vase
Karen Karnes
November 17, 1925 -July 12, 2016
Brooklyn, NYC, NY

Mug
Tiffany Hilton
Florence, MA

Both of these works were created as part of a demo series that Cooper had done for his students here at Chases Garage. Each week he and the students picked a different ceramicist and Cooper chose to share a technique of what they are known for. These particular pieces aren’t just using techniques to create a new piece of work-they are direct copies, a master study mimicking form and finish. Though these were crafted by Cooper’s own hands, he feels he cannot sell them considering the visual representations belong to other artists.

What is most interesting and perplexing is to consider Tiffany Hilton’s mug. It is a functional piece. A mug. With specific glazing techniques and style, does this mug belong to her independently? Who owns the shape of a mug? Does anyone? Mugs, vessels, ceramics of all varieties have been created for centuries across time and history. Can we ever create something new? Can we adapt and evolve what we’ve seen or created before and claim it as our own creation?

These are certainly important questions to ask as an artist, especially as one who creates work to be sold for profit.  



barrelmakerpottery.com

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Source: barrelmakerpottery.com
Posted
Authorcait giunta

Kristy Cavaretta enjoys exploring the minutiae of domestic life through a variety of media.

The call for Ransom coincided with the deluge of back to school photos on social media this September. While thinking about the call and the work that I like to explore – the clothes we dress ourselves in, banal physical objects we touch as a part of our routine before we leave the house in the morning, piles of laundry – I couldn't help but be drawn to the fact that teens and preteens are wearing totally tattered jeans again. On the first day of school one post even told me specifically that they were purchased at Abercrombie & Fitch, for $88. Of course I have a pair myself! But for some reason seeing them on an 11 year old really seemed to highlight the saturation of the trend.

I paused to think about how many times in my adult life machine torn and shredded denim had come back around and the first time I remember reading an article about the Hipster trend closer to the turn of the century while living in Los Angeles. Though torn denim has been a nod to anti-establishment since the Vietnam and Punk eras of decades past the latest “Hipster” wave was an effort to be ironic yet authentic. Suburban young adults were moving into big city burbs like Venice Beach, Silverlake, and of course Brooklyn and in an effort to avoid the mainstream they found fashion in thrift stores, vintage shops, and inspiration from the rural working class. The trucker hat, cans of PBR, vinyl and polaroid cameras, and thread bare denim have been icons of this movement and moved into the mainstream now for well more than a decade.

With this in mind I want to explore the actual authentic articles side by side with their consumer counterpart. I want to share the stories behind the actual articles next to the price tags of the manufactured to see if you can feel the weight of the difference, or the leap between the two, perhaps it’s not much of a leap at all on the surface? How does it feel to wear the look of years of manual labor and blue collar work as a fashion statement when your profession doesn’t allow you to leave your computer screen for more than a bathroom break?

@twoifbysee

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

Bending of Wills
Fiber
2018

Perception of optics means everything to me, what can be seen as indiscernible minuscule dots of thread from one distance, can transform into an unquestionable image of photorealism likeness from another. Ironically, the lack of optics in my subjects garner the opportunity to fill in the blanks and become the curator.

‘Bending Of Wills’ personifies the thin veil of perception and what we think we may see based off the opinions of others not directly affected. We live in a day in time where thinking for ourselves isn’t a priority, but herd mentality and keyboard bullying reigns true. We do not react to what we see organically, but instead search comment sections for a premeditated opinion to something that’s within our rights of feeling.

Witnessing people of specific ethnicities being ostracized and threatened on and offline for using their voices against injustices by those benefiting from appropriation, causes those with the potential power to using their voice into a state of stalemate and loss of fight. No one wants to be the target, yet no one wants to continually see their life be used as an editorial for the runway or a mask on Halloween, but which is worse? So then our views and beliefs become skewed, what used to push us into a rage of ancestral protection has now forced many into a state of latency and asking ourselves is it even that serious? We don’t want to be considered overly-emotionally, we don’t want to be labeled as dramatic, we don’t want to be labeled as individuals who can never take joke and constantly told to relax. To fit in, we emulate and sometimes we destroy everything in the process to do so.

Our wills were once bent at the mercy at what we once believed but now what we tolerate. Training our accents away, refusing customary foods, practices and deciding to not speak out when an obvious appropriation is plaguing your culture. Instead creating a new tradition of resentment and eventually decimating everything that made you different, just not seem so different anymore… Becoming the children of a lost culture.

@ravenkiannad_art

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta


2018

Yoav Horesh_Moonrise notes - Yoav Horesh.jpg

In 1941 acclaimed photographer Ansel Adams made one of his most iconic images "Moonrise, Hernandez, Mexico" that became a center for controversy and discussion for decades later. The photograph became so popular and desired that Adams personally printed over 1,300 "copies" of this photograph during his career. The photograph's reputation and popularity grew even more when a print made by Adams in 1948, sold at auction for the price of $71,500 in 1971 ($432,100 in 2017). In 2006, the same print sold for $609,600 ($740,000 in 2017) at a Sotheby's auction.

Adams was a landscape photographer with a strong affinity to the "American Landscape" and for large format photography in general. Less known is the fact he was also very socially and environmentally concerned with his work as a photographer and as an artist/activist. We tend to think about his grand landscape images that were made into calendars, mug coasters and framed posters at offices and waiting rooms. But his photographic work was political and socially driven from the powerful pictures of trees and rivers that need to be preserved/conserved to the documentation of Japanese American families held in "Manzanar War Relocation Center" in California during World War II.

In the summer of 2018 I went on a photographic road trip around the United States. The plan was to visit old friends that I have not seen in a long time and to explore cultural aspects and the landscape of this country/continent that I have never seen before. Within few days after my departure, the trip became also a journey through the American social landscape as seen and documented by many photographers since the inception of photography. The country that has been my home for most of my adult life, merged with my photographic education and influences I have internalized in the past 20 years while studying, working and teaching in the field.

The submitted photograph was made few hundred yards away from the US-Mexican border, in a place called "Law West of the Pecos", Texas.
At around 10 o'clock at night, while driving southeast, I noticed the moonrise starting to paint this charged landscape between the two countries with a clear and bright light. Adam's photograph echoed in my mind as I got off the main road and discovered these abandoned structures placed just under the moon. It reminded me of Hernandez in the neighboring state, New Mexico, that came to light due to the dramatic photograph Adams made in 1941.


Accompanying my photograph is a "collaborative"' written account of Mr. Adams and myself in making our different moon pictures 77 years apart.


yoavhoresh.com

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta
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I am attracted to earthy, untamed wildness in nature. I make sculptural, organic and whimsical adornments for the body using textured metal--silver, copper, bronze and gold--and freeform cabochons cut from natural stones. I handpick river rocks smoothed by time from along the Northeast and Northwest coastline, and I seek out turquoise, lapis and other unusual gemstones Southwestern desert nomads cut and polish themselves. My jewelry evokes the mood of the desert, ocean and mountain landscapes, and not unlike in the natural world, no two pieces are exactly alike. I design the jewelry I love to wear myself; my adornments can be worn for all occasions.

I view the world from the principle of Etuaptmumk, the Mi'kmaw word for Two-Eyed Seeing, and live a life that integrates indigenous ways of knowing with western science. I think about the world from a “mestiza consciousness,” a philosophical thought process driven by ambiguity and contradiction derived from my multiple identities, or la frontera/borderlands. I am a first generation U.S. American whose Colombian mother and Jewish Russian father constructed a bi-lingual, multi-religious home in a predominately white wooded NYC suburb. Ósea/that is, I am located between places; I live “here” in the North and I dream constantly of “there,” the South. Often, I am without place. The elements jewelry-making invites into the studio to dance—fire, metal, stone and water— grounds and roots me to the Earth.

As both la conquistadora and la indigina reside within me, I am sandwiched between cultures, unsettled and conflicted. Can I, and others, who live betwixt and between appropriate cultures? What does it mean to borrow or steal that which was already taken (from us and by us)?

I believe those who decorate women and men’s bodies with ornamentation from resources taken from land and practices from human cultures, have a responsibility to mediate the spaces where stolen lands, bodies and other colonial practices intersect with art to create public and private conversations about the liberation struggles of land-based cultures for self determination, truth telling reparations for harm done, and structural violence and other forms of social injustices so we, collective humanity, can repair, restore, and mature into our highest potential which is ours.


M E S A L A J E W E L R Y

melindasalazar.com

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

Rhinestone Moccasins

I have Abenaki heritage. Not a lot. 6-7%. But growing up, it’s importance in my life outshined the other places where my family is from – England, Germany, Ireland. It means a lot to my father that we are Abenaki. He would often talk about it with me and show me the one photo that we have of our Abenaki relative, Minnie, in her traditional clothing.

But it’s also true that I’m from the suburbs of New Jersey and that my experiences growing up were about as far from Abenaki life as they could be. My family saw Native Americans through the lens of culture and the media – a romanticized portrait painted in movies and books. We loved Dances with Wolves. We had small statues of famous Native American warriors around our home. I asked for pair after pair of white pleather moccasins decorated with rhinestones – swapping one for the next as they wore out. In my gorgeous footwear I was Pocahontas or Tiger Lily, exploring the wilds of my backyard. I never knew and it never mattered that these had nothing to do with my ancestors, nor with the real people in Abenaki tribes living 6 hours north of me.

When I applied for college, my parents encouraged me to check the ethnicity box for Native American and I did, showing up in admissions files right next to people who had authentic connections to and experiences with Abenaki life. Potentially benefiting from that check box without a valid claim to it.

Today I find myself grappling with what it means to appropriate one’s own heritage. What part of my Abenaki heritage is it appropriate for me to assume? The experiences that I shared with my father were real. Our mutual love of our Native American roots is real. But to say I’m Abenaki is to appropriate so much of what is real for others – including hardship and adversity – that is not real for me.

“Rhinestone moccasins” is an exploration of these question. A self-portrait of me at around age 4, claiming an imagined Abenaki identity while the real Abenaki flag sits behind me and all around.

katherineerrecart.com

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

Laura Stedenfeld is an artist and designer based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. She studied at Parsons, The New School of Design, earning a BFA in Architecture. Her practice as an artist is rooted in exploration of the unseen, and often destructive, impact of human settlement and its implications upon individual experience. This exploration interplays with her professional career as a landscape architect: critiquing some of the prevailing ideas at the heart of the discipline while responding to a long held fascination with human settlement and the manipulation of landscapes.

Using playful pessimism In her paintings and drawings, “dots” are devices for invasive confrontation that trespass in order to break the territory of the existing landscape painting. The work utilizes paintings by others as both material and mechanism; the act of invasion by dots is itself the subject and the process of the work. Each appropriation indulges a desire to claim ownership of landscape. This is an inclination of every human individual which quickly extrapolates to the militaristic federal and global scale.

Here on earth, we have come to experience territorialization many symptoms - resource extraction, war, pollution, invasion, violence and global dromology. Humans’ increasing speed and influence has direct implications upon the health and function of living landscapes. All acts upon landscape are forms of war which degrade and reform land - territorialization is underway at every moment.

The act of claiming landscape that is not one’s own, particularly by a female artist, points to a dialogue about violent power plays that are enacted across cities and lands - affecting all landscapes and bodies.

These appropriated sites lose the gravity of earth when populated by abstract spots that float, hover, sink, and scatter across the perspectival surface within an entirely new “cartoon” atmosphere. Here, through occupation and abstraction in Stedenfeld’s landscapes, a field of dots within perspective protects us from the harsh realities of invaded and degraded landscapes with their seemingly cheerful anti-matter.

laurastedenfeld.com

laura_stedenfeld_ransom

RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

2018

My work pertains to the perception of appropriated, symbolic imagery strewn through an empty field, contrasted against a stark white backdrop. Working in only black ink with slight undertones of grey, I aim to get the viewer questioning: What do these symbols mean? Further pushing themselves to think: Where have I seen these symbols before, and what did they tell me then, and now? A floating hand, a house engulfed in flames… these are not inconceivable, newly contrived symbols, but to each viewer, they tell a different story. By appropriating commonly used imagery into awkward, nuanced compositions, I aim to push each viewer to weave their own narrative based of the notions that they bring their own understanding to the images shown before them. The appropriation of various symbols allows me to adapt new meaning to each sign used, creating an account that is entirely my own. Through the appropriation of various symbols, I aim to create a layer of complexity, which adds a dimensionality to each piece.

These appropriated sites lose the gravity of earth when populated by abstract spots that float, hover, sink, and scatter across the perspectival surface within an entirely new “cartoon” atmosphere. Here, through occupation and abstraction in Stedenfeld’s landscapes, a field of dots within perspective protects us from the harsh realities of invaded and degraded landscapes with their seemingly cheerful anti-matter.

karolinaolivia.squarespace.com

Karolina_Tumilowicz

RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

Close Your Eyes (a Montgomery mansion, Portrait of a Maori + The Wawalag Sisters and the Rainbow Serpent),
watercolor + ink on Sennelier paper
3x8 cm

Shift Interior Scenes (Fort Walton Beach, cave paintings + Jacob Lawrence)
watercolor + ink on Sennelier paper
3x4.5 cm

 

Bury It Deep (Wetumpka farmland with silos, cave paintings, pictographs, Kent Cloth from Ghana + Eastern Sioux baby carrier)
watercolor on Bee paper
1.25”x7.25”, matted + framed to 6”x12”

There was this abandoned farmland that nature was reclaiming on the corner of Troy Highway and Eastern Boulevard in my youth. In passing, it always held my attention due to the birds, insects and wildlife abundant among the wildflowers, brush and house-eating vines. The silos stood with doors open no longer providing cover for grains, but rather shelter for spiders, bats, owls and creatures just passing through. That corner of the world held such wonder to this small-city girl. Then one day, as if overnight, it was all gone, completely leveled for parking lots and strip malls. In grief and anger, I cried and questioned, “How many lives have been lost for the sake of property and prosperity?”

“Bury It Deep” sets out to portray how we have segregated each other and segregated ourselves from nature over time. Various images were pulled from “Art History” by Marilyn Stokstad to represent indigenous peoples, as well as pushing the point that we often stake our claims on whatever our eyes desire without regard for life and history. This Land is Yours. This Land is Mine. Yet, we are all sojourners in a land that is not, nor ever was, ours alone.

www.nellandgrey.com

Karolina_Tumilowicz

RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

The truth is often stranger than fiction. Altering materials I create works addressing domesticity and womanhood where nothing is as it seems. Seemingly normal from afar I use personal and found objects to communicate issues around mental illness, family, gender, and social taboos. I make observations in the everyday, finding the bizarre and absurd in the familiar. I play with materials and find interesting and odd juxtapositions. Hiding and revealing a stream of contradictions. In the studio I make interventions through assemblage and drawing. Sometimes I find the pairing right away, other times the material of interest will sit with me for months before I find its mate. I connect with the Japanese ceramic method and philosophy Kintsukuroi, which treats breakage and repair as part of the history of an object. Rather than the something to disguise, the imperfections of an object adds to its allure, making it more beautiful for having been broken.

Through research, practice and experimentation I have looked at the work of Dadaists, such as Hannah Höch. Surrealists like Marcel Duchamp, Paul Klee, and Frida Kahlo. Contemporary artists and dark humorists like Wayne White, Wangechi Mutu, and Mike Kelley. Confessional artists such as Louise Bourgeois and Mary Kelley. I am drawn to literature, film, music, and comedy that tap into the relationships of attraction and repulsion, dark humor, and the surreal.

Surrounded by mental illness and a dysfunctional social structure I subscribe to the truth that everyone creates and lives in their own reality. I do this work to understand myself and what drives me as a caregiver. To understand that by fixing something you must also deem it as broken. I want the viewer to examine my work and their own surroundings with a sense of curiosity. What is the evidence we leave behind? What is normal?

ashleynormal.com

Karolina_Tumilowicz

RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

Your prison is my prison.

Your freedom is my freedom.

Separated by our own personal prisons, whether they be physical, cultural, emotional, or cognitive.

Connected by our suffering.

We are one human family.

kenleydarling.com

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

Untitled (boy in clown costume)
2015

Untitled (boy laughing)
2014

Each trip to a flea market, yard sale, or thrift shop is a unique find. While rummaging through shoeboxes and hand woven baskets, I search for precious memories of domestic pasts via the anonymous photograph. These prized possessions, once intended to be stuck to refrigerators, thumbed through in albums with intimacy and care, are now displayed for all to pillage through in estate sales. Now void of their original context and stripped of identity, these objects exist with bent corners, faded coloring and patinas offering endless narratives. The more antique images I discover, I wonder what photographs from present day would look like in the future. Will we treat the digital decay of a photograph as fondly as a well-worn print corner or a faded and stained image in a frame? Through digital manipulation via binary code corruption of these found vernacular photographs, I am reassigning image value within a social archive. The new image creates a questioning of the societal shift from storing and exchanging analogue images to the storing and sharing of the digital files, and ones intra/interpersonal relationship to this imagery.

nickschietromo.com

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta

Video, color, sound, TRT 00:12:48 Screenings: Nieuwe Vide, Haarlem, Netherlands Endless Biennial, New York City West Virginia Mountaineer Short Film Festival, West Virginia UNEXPOSED Microcinema, North Carolina Jornadas de Reapropriacion, Mexico SF Indiefest, California Berlin Experimental Film Festival, Germany Tahoe Underground Film Festival, Nevada WNDX Festival of Moving Image, Canada Haverhill Experimental Film Festival #4 (Jury Mention Recipient), Massachusetts Writ Large , UC Santa Cruz, California Milwaukee Underground Film Festival, Wisconsin The Vassar Review

Counter-Charge appropriates and repositions the gender dynamics of video game spaces and narratives made by and for men. In the 1989 adult-oriented computer series, Leisure Suit Larry wanders the jungle of a colonized village searching for love, which he finds, after a multitude of failed romantic interactions, with Passionate Patti, a perfect and unattainable woman. In an act of cathexis, Larry's energies concentrate on Patti in a complex of libido, love, and gender expression that leads Larry/Patti on an investigation of duality. bell hooks' meditations on love attempt to guide them, but are rejected and re-purposed by the game's instinct. Blocked by his own ego and the constructs of the game in which he wanders, Larry's desires are continually repressed.

alexhovet.com

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Source: https://vimeo.com/145794196
Posted
Authorcait giunta

Buddah at HomeGoods
2018

Buddah at HomeGoods
2018

My academic background is in both religious studies and visual art. In this current series, Buddha at HomeGoods, I examine a phenomena that has been of interest to me for many years; the cultural appropriation of non-western religious imagery and its application to both secular, and highly commercial products. I am particularly interested in the image of the Buddha as it is frequently depicted in mainstream western culture and how this depiction creates and sustains a 21st century Orientalism. In this work, I encourage the viewer to revisit the commercial application of the Buddha’s image as a form of spiritual colonialism, in which sacred imagery has been stripped of its original meaning and context and reimagined by and for a western audience. The colonial aspect of this exchange is further reinforced by the path of commercial production and export of these items predominantly from workers in the East and Southeast Asian nations to consumers in the West.

taramorin.com

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Source: taramorin.com
Posted
Authorcait giunta

Me-erlyn

Mima Preston is a Vancouver based artist and psychotherapist. Mima’s practice includes performance, installation, and collaboration. Her work explores experiences of loneliness, connection, identity, and mortality. As both therapist and artist she is interested in patterns of human behaviour and personal narrative, specifically how these can be translated into visual language or conceptual beginnings. As a process based artist Mima often employs craft practices such as weaving, pottery, knitting and sewing to create visual evidence of her investigations. Currently she is translating statistical data from mental health surveys into design code for a series of hand-woven textiles.

Me-erlyn is a poster sized photographic print from the performance, Who am I? The performance was created in 1994 without the use of digital photography, Photoshop or social media apps. It was re-photographed, enlarged, and laser printed as a photo conceptualist work in 2003. The artist sits on a beige coach, her upper body concealed behind a poster of the actress Marilyn Monroe. Initially the work explored the desire and longing to change ones identity or image to be something or someone we are not. As a work re-presented in 2018, the work speaks to the appropriation of the celebrity image within social media as a form of status, relevancy, and legitimacy. The work becomes a comment on the effects of altered imagery on a population bombarded with controlled composites of the human body and cultural identity.

@mimaeden

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RANSOM

exploring the edges of appropriation
10.20.18 - 12.13.18

Posted
Authorcait giunta